A friend of mine was recently asked, “If you could have any career you wanted, what would you be doing?” My friend said, “After all I’ve done in the last 20 years, I still have no clue what career would make me happy?”

My sage advice to him, and to anyone trying to answer this question, is to think back to the period in your life when you weren’t responsible for generating an income, say from ages 6 to 22. What did you like to do when nobody was telling you what to do or what you SHOULD do? When did that tuning fork go off in you heart? When did three or four hours pass so quickly you didn’t even look up? When were the times you surprised yourself and your peers that you could do something not everybody could do? For me those activities that resonated all had something to do with communication to an audience — writing, speaking, advertising, “slaying the great dragon of ambiguity” to help define and clarify something. What dragons do you like to slay?

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Kroger sells a product they call “Fat Free Half & Half.” Half & Half is supposed to be half cream, half whole milk, with a butterfat content of about 12%. TWELVE PERCENT. What’s the story, Kroger?

I invite spokespeople from Kroger, all members of the dairy industry, and anyone who has ever tried this product to comment.

Happy Halloween!  I didn’t fall off the blogosphere. I’ve just been mighty busy. Many irons in ye olde fyre.  I’ve added TEACHING to my resume in addition to “real world” work. Those who do also teach.

I hope to share some thrilling Sage observations with you in November.  In the meantime, take a trip down memory lane with my three most popular posts from 2012-2014:

#1 https://paulsagemarketing.com/2013/01/24/my-best-brands-birthday/

#2 https://paulsagemarketing.com/2012/12/21/how-elvis-met-nixon-is-how-branding-leads-to-sales/

#3 https://paulsagemarketing.com/2014/04/15/ozarka-is-made-in-texas-that-aint-natural/

Have a safe night of bite-sized fun!

If you don’t live in Arkansas (and there’s a good chance you don’t) you’re missing the fun of Arkansas advertising.  Today in my fair city of Little Rock I was listening to a local radio station and the spokesman for a Chevrolet dealership pitched the Impala as “the car for the man who’s not trying to impress anybody.”

I doubt that’s what the folks in Detroit had in mind for copy, but you have to admit it’s unique. Not unique in the way Rosser Reeves intended for a USP.  I’d bet nobody else positions it the way we do in Arkansas.  The 2014 Impala. Shown here in Razorback Red.

The 2014 Chevy Impala. It's nothing special, and that's what's special about it.

The 2014 Chevy Impala. It’s nothing special, and that’s what’s special about it.

 

Conroe store ACADEMYIts name is simple, its logo features a capital A, but too many people call it “Sports Academy.” WRONG!!  It’s Academy Sports. OK, officially Academy Sports + Outdoors (with a plus sign).  Maybe people confuse it with Sports Authority, a smaller competitor with little to no retail presence in my neck of the nation.  Drives me nuts. It’s a good store with good stuff.  Get it right.

Have a nice day, and enjoy the 4th of July weekend, States United of America.

 

 

I feel like the kid who just found out about Santa Claus, or, in keeping with the season, the Easter Bunny.  My illusion has just been shattered.

Ozarka® water is not made in Arkansas.

I just assumed it was.  But what do I know, I live in Arkansas.  Nonetheless, I was just being logical, or intuitive, at least.  “OZARKA” sounds like it’s from around here, our “Natural State” of hot springs and rolling hills and trout fishing.  And the Ozark Mountains.

2014-04-15 Ozarka 2

Ozarka’s packaging boasts it’s made in Texas.  Texas?  Texas water?  Is that supposed to be good? I grew up in Houston.  I think the tap water in Little Rock tastes better. And there’s no such place as Hot Springs National Park, Texas.

Pull back  the curtain, Toto.  Egad, the Wizard of Ozarka is just one of many brands pumped out by Nestlé Waters North America.  Thus we have an Arkansas-sounding label coming from the Texas operations of a North American company based in Switzerland. Yodelayheehoo.

2014-04-15 Ozarka 1

Oh well, it’s just water, the commodity that’s increasingly never common.  Last time I checked, a liter of Evian was selling for $1.99 at the local Kroger.  A liter of Kroger’s store-brand water was 69 cents.  That’s a 188% premium for Evian. Some people take this brand thing way too seriously.  And the marketers smile.